18th Century Cape with Double Capelets

I love making custom costume garments for people and model/stylist, Leslie Ruby Randall is no exception.When she asks me to make her garments I know it’s going to be a fully fun challenge. She knows exactly what she wants for her photo shoots and that’s easy to work with. We decided on version A the fully lined and hooded double cape.\n\n18th Century Cape by Tracy McElfresh\n\nThe capes construction is easy although it’s no joke with the amount of material involved which means hours of cutting, pressing, pinning/clipping, sewing and all the hemming. We used 15 yards of fabric for this cape.\n\nHere is the fabric she picked out by Zoey Christine, called; Meadow Lark, color; Corn Silk.\n\nZoey Christine Meadow Lark Corn Silk 18th Century Cape by Tracy McElfresh\n\nI asked Ruby why the cape and here is what she said,” I chose the cape because I love anything that looks like it came from the 18th century and fairy tales. I fell in love with that rich canary yellow color because I had seen it trending here and there for 2016. It really spoke to me, made me feel cheerful and I loved the rare color combination of a redhead wearing yellow. I had so much fun mixing the patterns to give it that unmatched, accidental coordination look and the heaps of florals in the ruffles looked so Parisian to me!!!”\n\nNow lets get to a little of the making. We used a satin lining for the cape so it would hang correctly and not stick to the cotton outer shell. I like my pieces drape over night. I find parts cut on the bias can get longer while parts cut on the grain remain the same. This gives the pieces time to behave how they will be worn before sewing them all together, gives me a little break and a day to reflect on the garment. By not rushing into the garments sewing construction opportunities for great ideas on any alterations I want to make to the design also happen.\n\n

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\n\nMy pieces and layout were so big I could not get a good photo, it took up my living room to the dining room. These are the only two photos I got of the cutting.\n\n \n\nThe double capelet and the hood were quite a bit of yardage on their own.\n\nA couple tips for sewing large and long pieces, use clips instead of pins they’re faster. Try draping the fabric over your shoulder while sewing to keep a good handle on it. Pull yardage from your shoulder down to your machine as you sew. Don’t attempt this with pins in your fabric or you could get hurt, this is a second reason of why clips are cool.\n\nHere are more of Kevin owner of Red Generation Photography professional photos from Leslie’s shoot.\n\n \n\nWhen I asked Leslie why she chose Kevin she said, “He is a great choice for some of my (story telling through wardrobing) because that is how he views photo shoots, like telling a story.”\n\nHere is another one of his amazing photos. Modeling is Shelly Cresanti\n\nPhoto by Keven James of Shelly Cresanti\n\nBehind the scenes~ I have been a bad girl! I cut out my depression era replica a month ago and I’ve made 4 other dresses without finishing it.  I have an exciting month ahead though!\n\n \n\nThank you for reading!\n\n \n\n 

Tracy McElfresh

Tracy McElfresh

Tracy McElfresh is the owner of Tracy’s Sewing Studio LLC.
Tracy McElfresh
By | 2016-10-03T07:32:39+00:00 October 3rd, 2016|1800s Style Fashion, Costumes, Makes of 2016, Uncategorized|0 Comments

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