Green County Fair Sewing Competitions, Interview with a First Place Winner, Marlene MacVane

Friends and followers, this is my very first attempt at an interview style post! I’m always up for learning, trying new things and connecting in my community.

Don’t forget at the bottom of this post is my,”Behind the scenes” addition and I have some new free community events you may be interested in.

Meet Marline MacVane, stunt mom to four humans and four fur babies, from Xenia, Ohio.  The first time I met Marlene I noticed how friendly and outgoing she was and we automatically connected.

Is this your first year entering your sewing projects in the Greene County Fair?
This is my second year entering the Fair. I had been wanting to do it since I learned to sew, a little over four years ago.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How did you find out about the Green County Fair’s sewing competition, does it cost money to enter and can any one enter who lives in Ohio?
I would see posts from other people in sewing groups about entering in their county fairs, so I looked up the Greene County Fair, found the fair book, and looked at what categories I wanted to enter. I’m not sure what it costs if you do just a single item or two, but for $30 you can enter up to 25 items, get a pass to the fair for the whole week, and vote for fair board members if you are a Greene County resident. You do not have to be a resident of the county to enter items in the fair. There are also categories for youth, senior citizens, and those in assisted living facilities.

What divisions did you enter and what did make?
I entered sewn items, a scrapbook, and several photos. The sewing item categories I entered were; Woman’s Dress or jumper, I entered a dress of my own design (mostly) ; Girl’s Dress or jumper, I entered a dress made from a vintage pattern that was graded by Lynn Jeffries (Handmaiden’s Cottage) ; Doll Clothes, I entered a dolls dress that was a mash up of the Peppermint Swirl by Candy Castle Patterns and the Seaside Sailor dress for Dolly by Tie Dye Diva (that was my favorite garment entered); Apron, I entered an apron made using the Jezebelle pattern from Handmaiden’s Cottage (I used the front bodice pattern pieces of the apron for the front of my dress); Miscellaneous machine sewn item, I entered a girl’s shirt that I made from piecing together fabric scraps then used a pattern from Jilly Atlanta; Miscellaneous quilted Item, I made a quilted pillow for my mom, my own design.

How does the judging work and do you get nervous?
I really don’t know much about judging. I just put my tags on the items entered, I drop them off, when the fair opens they have been judged. I was probably nervous the first time, but this time I was so busy and exhausted I didn’t have time to think about being nervous.

What was your favorite part of the process?
While the ribbons are nice, and I am a highly competitive person, I love that the deadline gives me motivation to get things done. I really need deadlines or I spend to much time thinking about what I could do and not actually do it. For instance, the pillow I entered was a Mother’s Day gift for my mom. It was for Mother’s Day 2016. It just sat in my fabric cabinet, unfinished, until a few days before the fair. And I have been wanting to make fitted women’s clothes, I had never sewn for figures with curves before. So I marked down that I was going to make a woman’s dress, and I started it with 23 whole hours left before cut-off time for turning in fair items.

What did you learn from your experience?
That it’s ok not to win ALL the blue ribbons. That I really should make things throughout the year and put them away for fair time. And that it feels really good to walk up to the doors of the home arts exhibits and have my dress hanging right where it’s the first thing everyone entering will see.

How do you think others could benefit from entering?
Everyone who sews should enter their county fair, or even a fair in another county. Or state fair. It is fun to see your items displayed and to check out other people’s work. I find it very motivating. Also, I would love to see more garments entered, there was very little competition, and there was no competition in the doll clothes category.

Any additional info?
I won first place for the last minute, pulled it out of my derriere, woman’s dress, the apron, the dolls dress, and the girl’s shirt. I won second place for the girl’s dress. The pillow didn’t place, but I love it and I’m sure my mom will. I also won a couple of blue ribbons for photos and one for my scrapbook, and a couple second place ribbons for photos. At $6 for each first place winner and $4 for each second place winner, I made $54, so that paid for my entries and some fair food. I did not get all my items done that I had marked down on the entry form, but I’m planning on having more done much earlier for next year. And I want to enter new crafting categories.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Behind the Scenes~
Our Dayton Garment Designers Meet Up is this month!

This group is for anyone who makes their own clothes. All ages, skill levels, genders are welcome. Come learn new skills, make new sewing friends, learn about making clothes that fit but do not cost a fortune.

The Dayton Garment Designers Meetup is not a free class although you can learn from making sewing friends. It is simply a meet up. We will cover various events including socials, group classes, relevant exhibitions, fabric shopping/day trips, fabric swaps, interesting talks and tips and so much more. Sewing is fun!

Marlene and I also collaborated an event called Vintage Sewing Machine Art Show!

Let’s start our own industrial EDU revolution!
Do you have a vintage sewing machine? Marlene MacVane and I had a great idea of having a vintage sewing machine art show. To make it even better we thought what if people from all over the world could come learn and see awesome sewing machines without leaving their homes?
It’s a virtual Party!! Starts in November!
Just like any virtual party you do not need to be online always, check in when you want to, join the fun. There will be games, prizes and networking.
Get good photos of your machines, share background, ownership, uses, where it was made and other info you can educate us with. Each day we will do a different time period.
Day 1 1840-1919
Day 2 1920-1939
Day 3 1940-1949
Day 5 1950- 1959
Day 6 1960-1969
Day 7 1970 and on

Thank you for reading!

Tracy McElfresh

Dream it, Sew it!

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Tracy McElfresh

Tracy McElfresh

Tracy McElfresh is the owner of Tracy’s Sewing Studio LLC.
Tracy McElfresh
By | 2017-09-11T07:37:07+00:00 September 11th, 2017|Interviews w/Sewists, makes of 2017|0 Comments

Leave A Comment