It’s no secret I love buying new fabric almost as much as I love making things. However, I’m about to present you with a project that is free from buying new fabric, is easy and is eco-friendly.

It all started in 2016 when Ms. Glenda Miles, owner of Creative Communion in Pendleton Art Center, asked if I would teach the t-skirt class at her studio. I jumped at the chance to learn and share with my sewing community.

The designs have evolved and it has been almost 3 years since I fashioned my first t-skirt.  I have taught over a dozen beginners how to make this easy skirt.

 

I believe it takes at least 3 times to understand how a project works, how long it takes to complete and to get comfortable teaching it to others. Glenda let me practice on her favorite t-shirts for a second skirt.

After the first class is was apparent that the shirts emblems dictated the placement of each panel and if the shirts were small they would make a shorter skirt.

Soon we figured it all out. Sewing 2 shirts together forms longer panels. This solved the problem of having a big emblem in an inappropriate area and the length issue at the same time.

The second class was a breeze and everyone was happy with their creations!

Once class pictures came out I began getting custom requests for t skirts. My imagination of possibilities went wild with designs.

Once you get the concept of the construction the possibilities are limitless. You will be happy to know making a t-skirt out of your old t-shirts is easy.

Directions for Tracy’s T-Skirt

Please, before you start take some time to relax, enjoy the process and know that nothing is ever perfect, just make and love it anyways.~Tracy McElfresh

  1. Choose 3-6 shirts you do not mind cutting up.
  2. Cut 6 gores (skirt panels) out of your shirts placing motifs where you like.
  3. Cut the waist band 5” wide and the length of your waistline. No bigger
  4. Arrange and design panels in the order you want them together and pin them
  5. Sew with an 70/11 jersey needle on a medium zig zag stitch 1/2” seam allowance, do not sew last seam, it should be one long flat piece  
  6. Staystitch (Sewing across the top waist of gores by using a straight stitch 1/4” seam allowance from the top) This will keep your skirt from stretching during the making.
  7. Check waist band against your body an make sure it is not too big.
  8. Fold waist band short ends in half so that it’s 2.5” wide and baste stitch length together.This piece should still be one long rectangle piece. It’s easier to sew flat pieces than circles.
  9. Sew basted flat waist band to your skirt top with a  zig zag stitch, 1/2” seam allowance
  10. Pin the final seam and carefully try on your skirt. This is where we will see if it needs to be taken in. It needs to fit snuggly around the waist to stay on.
  11. Stitch final seam back or side to make your skirt a complete circle. Fit again
  12. Hem the bottom of your T-skirt by folding under 1/2” and sewing a straight stitch across the  edge. CONGRATULATIONS you have made something awesome!!

 

This is one I made for my fellow Arts Council Volunteer Sue.

 

 

Thank you for reading!

Tracy McElfresh

Dream it, Sew it!

 

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Tracy McElfresh

Tracy McElfresh is the owner of Tracy’s Sewing Studio LLC.
Tracy McElfresh